The Right Words, The Right Time.

sara barnard

Fourteen years ago, I wrote a story about a girl.

I was thirteen at the time, and writing stories was what I did. And not just about girls. Planets that spoke to each other, mice who lived in the Underground, magic meerkats and friendly boats. Writing was my thing; it was beyond a hobby and more than just something I enjoyed. It was how I understood the world. Words had all the magic and possibility anyone could ever need. Put them in the right order, and you could create a world of your own. And maybe, if you got them just right, that world would be a place that would mean something to other people.

I’d written countless stories by the time I was thirteen – the first at age 6, in which the acknowledgements page listed all our family pets by name, including the guinea pigs – of varying length…

View original post 672 more words

Advertisement
The Right Words, The Right Time.

Walking on Water

Broken Light Collective

Photo taken by contributor Ty Fitzgerald, a man who has been diagnosed with Bipolar II. Ty has a fondness for Lo-fi and Lux filters because they intensify shadows, highlights and colors. Such photos visually represent the way he sees the world, a little brighter and darker than he imagines those without bipolar disorder see the world.

About this photo: “This photo was taken in New Smyrna Beach, FL at sunset. A father and son were fishing and I managed to get a shot with just the son in it. The tide was coming in and there was water pooling all around him. When I dropped to the sand to take the shot, it looked like he was walking on water. I like this shot a lot because it has that “decisive moment” that Henri Cartier-Bresson described, where just a split second sooner or later, it would not have worked. I like to take photos of people when…

View original post 59 more words

Walking on Water

We talked to our kids about souls

Thanks for posting – your pictures are a feast for the eyes.

Butterfly Mind

Swinging Bridge at Babcock State Park, West Virginia, autumn on andreabadgley.com Swinging Bridge at Babcock State Park, West Virginia

“Hey Mom, are trees living things or living beings?”

Our nine year old son looked into the forest then up at me as we hiked side by side along a gurgling brook. His dad and sister walked a few steps ahead of us. Upstream was the Glade Creek Grist Mill in West Virginia, a rustic wooden building with a pitched roof. Today its wet planks were framed by yellowing autumn trees.

“I guess that depends on what you mean by living being,” I said. “I think of a being as — ” I tried to think of words that would be familiar to him. I failed. “As a sentient being — something that has a soul.” The path was littered in gold, red, and toast brown leaves, and I kicked at a drift with my leather hiking shoe.

“Personally, I think of trees…

View original post 937 more words

Gallery

The Irrefutable Best Books of 2014, As Determined by Science*

Many Thanks for posting your list. Have shared with my readers and will be reading some titles from your list myself.

couldreads

IMG_0092It’s been a trying year here at Sorry Television. Sidetracked by work—and, let’s be honest, an endless procession of binge-worthy Netflix inventory—I am set to close out 2014 with a mere 32 books under my belt, near enough to bi-weekly that I should probably rebrand as You’re Welcome Television (subtitle: Reading Books Every So Often, Like When the Power Goes Out). I’m already planning redemptive 2015 reading goals (a book a day? a book an hour?) but for the time being I’ll have to accept mediocrity, and foist as much blame as possible on a shorter commute’s ability to stymie even the most dedicated bibliophile.

But I can claim a smidge of productivity this month, which is why I’m Indiana-Jonesing under the content door that is Christmas week to bring you The Irrefutable Best Books of 2014, a master list of this year’s greatest hits, as determined by 21 other “best of”s written by people who have actually read them…

View original post 573 more words

The Irrefutable Best Books of 2014, As Determined by Science*

‘Did We Have the Sense that America Cared How We Were Doing? We Did Not’

I see the consequences of this here in the UK too. Many thanks for posting such an interesting piece.

Longreads

In The Atlantic, James Fallows examines how Americans and political leaders became so disconnected from those who serve in the military—and the consequences of that disconnect:

If I were writing such a history now, I would call it Chickenhawk Nation, based on the derisive term for those eager to go to war, as long as someone else is going. It would be the story of a country willing to do anything for its military except take it seriously. As a result, what happens to all institutions that escape serious external scrutiny and engagement has happened to our military. Outsiders treat it both too reverently and too cavalierly, as if regarding its members as heroes makes up for committing them to unending, unwinnable missions and denying them anything like the political mindshare we give to other major public undertakings, from medical care to public education to environmental rules. The tone…

View original post 307 more words

‘Did We Have the Sense that America Cared How We Were Doing? We Did Not’

2014, A Year of Islands

Thank you for posting this piece. The description of your travels inspires me to see more of the world. Again, many thanks.

What an Amazing World!

Colorful Explosions Chinese New Year Fireworks, Hong Kong

Tempus fugit, where has the time gone? It feels to me that my second trip to Hong Kong was just a month ago. But the truth is it was back in late January, the first of a series of trips this year. Quitting my old job in December 2014 and not starting a new one until March this year only meant one thing: time to hit the road again.

James’ mother was very kind to invite me to spend two weeks in Hong Kong just in the time for the Chinese New Year celebration. From the impressive fireworks show at Victoria Harbor, to excursions to Hong Kong’s secluded white sand beaches and great hiking trails, to a remote heritage trail near the border with China dotted with beautiful ancestral halls, to villages scattered along the Outlying Islands, it was truly a two-week…

View original post 657 more words

2014, A Year of Islands

1st Female USADT Commander

I enjoyed reading this post. I take my hat off to you Lieutenant.

The Old Guard Journal

1st Lt. Lauran Glover, the first woman drill commander of the U.S. Army Drill Team [USADT], 4th Battalion, 3d U.S. Infantry Regiment (The Old Guard), and her Soldiers perform, Nov. 23, at a football game at Candlestick Stadium in San Francisco, Ca. (Courtesy photo) 1st Lt. Lauran Glover, the first woman drill commander of the U.S. Army Drill Team [USADT], 4th Battalion, 3d U.S. Infantry Regiment (The Old Guard), and her Soldiers perform, Nov. 23, at a football game at Candlestick Stadium in San Francisco, Ca. (Courtesy photo)
Being a female officer in a mostly male military is not the easiest job; however, there are women who continue to tear down the walls and barriers that have prevented them from certain positions.
1st Lt. Lauran Glover, a military police officer, has paved the way for women in the U.S. Army when she was recently selected as the first woman drill commander of the U.S. Army Drill Team [USADT], 4th Battalion, 3d U.S. Infantry Regiment (The Old Guard).
For more than 50 years, the USADT has showcased the U.S. Army both nationally and internationally through breathtaking routines with bayonet-tipped 1903 Springfield rifles.
As the commander…

View original post 446 more words

1st Female USADT Commander

When Enough Is Enough

Absolutely love this quote. Many thanks for posting.

Positive Outlooks

Seriously, be strong and know when enough is enough. Take your stand, speak up and refuse to let others hurt you. Throughout your lifetime some people will discredit you, disrespect you and treat you poorly for no apparent reason at all. Don’t consume yourself with trying to change them or win their approval. And don’t make any space in your heart to hate them. You don’t have control over what others think about you, but you do have control over how you decide to internalize their opinions. Leave them to their own judgments. Let people love you for who you are, and not for who they want you to be. Or let them walk away if they choose. They can’t harm you either way; it’s their understanding that is faulty, not yours. — Unknown

Man walking at sunset

View original post

When Enough Is Enough

Iain Duncan Smith’s portrait made from photos of people who died for being poor

This is exactly the thing the government may need to see exactly the damage caused by living on the breadline. This is due to one thing, the government’s sweeping benefit reforms that have left thousands homeless, unable to make ends meet and in some severe cases dying. I know personally of one person who has, and another who nearly took their lives as a direct consequence of this. I applauded you for representing it in such a candid and unique way.

Pride's Purge

(satire?)

 Click on image to enlarge:

Iain-Duncan-Smith Mosaic05

His victims:

Edward Jacques:edward jacques

Graham Shawcross:graham shawcross

David Coupe:David-Coupe

David Groves:david groves

Trevor Drakard:Trevor-Drakard

David Clapson:david clapson1

Annette Francis:annette francis

Nick Barker:Nick-Barker1

Leanne Chambers:leanne-chambers

Robert Barlow:Robert-Barlow

Cecilia Burns:ceciliaburns

Mark and Helen Mullins:Mark_Helen_Mullins

Martin Hadfield:Martin-Hadfield

Paul Reekie:paul-reekie

Tim Salter:Tim-Salter

Colin Traynor:colin traynor

Brian McArdle:brian_mcardle

Mark Wood:Mark-Wood1

Linda Wootton:Linda-Wootton

Chris Smith:chris smith

Karen Sherlock:karen sherlock

.

With thanks – and apologies – to Joe Wezorek:

Given this image’s inflammatory nature, I posted it with a great deal of trepidation. I had a hard time deciding if it was the right thing to do and I am still not sure. No, I didn’t have the consent of the families of those pictured, and I apologize for any additional pain that this image causes them.

‘War Minister’ is meant to be a satirical…

View original post 120 more words

Iain Duncan Smith’s portrait made from photos of people who died for being poor